Explore Our Resources

3700

In early 2014, the ABIM Foundation commissioned a survey to explore physician attitudes about overuse of medical services in the United States.

Nearly three out of four U.S. physicians said that frequent, unnecessary medical tests and procedures is a serious problem for America’s health care system—but just as many said that the average physician orders unnecessary medical tests and procedures at least once a week.

Here are 7 highlighted stats from the survey:

  1. 73 percent of physicians say the frequency of unnecessary tests and procedures is a very or somewhat serious problem.
  2. 66 percent of physicians feel they have a great deal of responsibility to make sure their patients avoid unnecessary tests and procedures.
  3. 53 percent of physicians say that even if they know a medical test is unnecessary, they order it if a patient insists.
  4. 58 percent of physicians say they are in the best position to address the problem, with the government as a distant second (15%).
  5. 72 percent of physicians say the average medical doctor prescribes an unnecessary test or procedure at least once a week.
  6. 47 percent of physicians say their patients ask for an unnecessary test or procedure at least once a week.
  7. 70 percent of physicians say that after they speak with a patient about why a test or procedure is unnecessary, the patient often avoids it.

The fact that physicians are aware of the problem, but continue to offer unnecessary care suggests that there may be a lack of resources and tools to facilitate better intervention. Typically, tests and procedures considered to be unnecessary involve specialists. Obtaining specialist feedback earlier and more often is a proven way for physicians to provide helpful intervention.

AristaMD offers clinical guidelines and specialist e-consults that provide fast-response specialist guidance to better inform the physician-patient dialogue. Our success with physician intervention is underscored by survey stat #7 above: patients generally trust their physician’s explanation. The challenge is connecting physicians with timely specialist feedback in order to have an informed conversation with patients about care that is necessary versus unnecessary.

Learn more about the results in the summary research report.

7 Survey Stats You Should Know About Unnecessary Care

In early 2014, the ABIM Foundation commissioned a survey to explore physician attitudes about overuse of medical services in the United States. Nearly three out of four U.S. physicians said that frequent, unnecessary medical tests and procedures is a …

READ MORE

What Are The Real Costs For A Hospital?

It’s a novel approach. A Utah Hospital tries to cut unnecessary hospital costs and improve patient care by asking the question “What are our actual costs”. It’s a question that isn’t easy to answer. More importantly, it’s a question …

READ MORE

Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sick

Dr. Iona Heath from Australia, is at the forefront of efforts worldwide to reduce and prevent over-diagnosis of disease. This is an outstanding interview with a challenging host — discussing the need for more discretion when it comes …

READ MORE

Why Hospitals Should Not Be Patient Resorts

As most hospital executives will acknowledge, operating margins are thin. Surprisingly, many hospitals aspire to improve patient satisfaction scores by offering resort-like amenities. Unsurprisingly, what patients actually care about is…well…getting great care. Focusing on resort-quality hospital stays increases …

READ MORE

How Harvard Attacks The High Cost Of Healthcare

“We’re not interested in just spending less money and sacrificing the outcomes,” said Jeffrey Selberg of Peterson Healthcare. “We know that there are better outcomes at less money. We like to say that quality and costs are mutually …

READ MORE

Request a Demo
X (close) [widget id="convertkit_form-2"]